click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20131028
20131105
STATION
CNNW 5
MSNBC 4
MSNBCW 4
CSPAN 3
KCSM (PBS) 3
KQED (PBS) 3
CSPAN2 2
KTVU (FOX) 1
LANGUAGE
English 34
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
, a new book looks at his little known legacy as a ground- breaking foreign-policy president. >> lincoln had to deal with a series of crises over the course of his presidency from france, from britain, from spain, even russian ships showed up off the atlantic coast. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel has launched new air strikes into syria. u.s. security officials say the attack came after nightfall, in the syrian port city of latakia after nightfall. the target was said to be russian-made, surface-to-ai
there are maybe two categories of copulation. those having political power. it is a matter of foreign policy. the other category deals with millions of people for which you have information from private service providers. you can ask them to provide information before providing it to the nsa. first, you have the harvest everything. this is under the category of population outside the scope of international security. which is quite wider than other countries. it is not a solution that we have in europe, and that is why when we see this data collected, we cannot only think of fighting against terrorism, but also thinking about offering things like that. >> we say it is about stopping terrorists, but is it about having a competitive edge, trolling for consumer behaviors and getting an edge on the competition in an economic war rather than a war on terrorism? >> everybody is paying everybody. they collect data. imagine 42% increase since 2010. everybody is collaborating with this kind of cyber espionage and criminality. it is not a question of one or the other, everyone is doing that. in 2012, t
supporting our foreign policy and national security objectives that we are more effectively weighing the risks and rewards of our activities that we are focused above all on threats to the american people. we need to ensure are collecting information not just because we can but because we should. because we need it for our security. so again, i won't go on too long. i think it's important top context you'llize some of these revelations to look at what the administration is doing to review our intelligence activities and to look at how we balance the need for security in this completely transformed world that we live in because of the technology advances that have occurred. and then against, as i said earlier, the clear and real privacy concerns that americans and people around the world share. >> you just mentioned that it's important for us to make sure that our intelligence gathering above all is about protecting american security and you and the president in the past have talked about the nsa really being focused on things like terrorism, proliferation of wmds. can au sure our all
frank discussions. mark, you and i have covered foreign policy a long time. this is a very unhappy group of people. to a certain extent there's spying everywhere. we know that. it's a little shock. there's gambling at mr. rick's. the germans want the same special relationship of no spying agreement that we have with the uk. at the same time, i think there really is anger about they said the flash point was merkel's cell phone. >> yeah, i think that's right, andrea. it's not just anger but embarrassment on their part. remember, the first allegations of potential nsa surveillance in europe came up during the summer. at the time the germans were among those saying we understand it. we think as a dispute it's ebbing away. our concerns have been more or less met. i think there's now a feeling they climbed down and didn't make a huge case out of it in the summer only to find out it was more persuasive, lasted longer and involved the top official and their government. so they have a lot of egg on their own face. what was interesting about the long article der spiegel published over the weekend,
of the region, the last measure of american foreign policy should be how it is received by the house. if there were a price for most irresponsible foreign policy, it would be surely be awarded to saudi arabia. it is the nation most responsible for the rise of islamic radicalism and militancy across the world. over the past four decades, the kingdoms immense oil wealth has been used to underwrite the export of an extreme intolerant and violent version of islam. go anywhere in the world from germany to indonesia and you will find islamic centers flush with saudi money spouting intolerance and hate. a top treasury official said -- >> if i could snap my fingers and cut off funding from one country, it would be saudi arabia. >> hillary clinton confirmed that saudi arabia remained a critical financial base for terrorism. she also said that there was only limited action to stop flow of funds from taliban and other such terrorists groups. saudi arabia was one of three countries in the world to recognize and support the taliban-led government in afghanistan until the 9/11 attacks. it is also
blowers. >> reporter: the allegations threaten to disrupt foreign policies with u.s. allies. >> i think the revelation from snowdon and the secrets revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we've listened in. >> reporter: but congressman peter king, the chairman of the house homeland security committee said america should stop apologizing. >> the reality is that the nsa has saved thousands of lives not just in the usa but france, germany, and throughout europe. >> reporter: former vice president dick cheney agrees the u.s. should remain cautious. >> our over all surveillance abilities are important and need to be preserved. >> reporter: and it remains to be seen if that careful diplomacy will go over so smoothly with lawmakers on their three-day visit to washington this week. >> al jazeera, we're live in washington, and the white house has yet to respond to the latest report of spying to world leaders? >> reporter: not officially. we have a briefing coming up in just over an hour
american foreign policy. plus the influence of rock legend lou reed and his impact on the culture from the 60s to today. >> hello, i'm libby casey. tonight on inside story we'll take a walk on the wild side and look at the life and legacy of iconic rocker lou reed who died at the age of 71. first we'll focus on american spying, specifically spying on friends, and our friends are not happy. tonight you can add spain to the list of countries that are demanding answers. the newest details emerge in this spanish newspaper "el mundo" reporting that phone calls from surveye survei. over the weekend came news that the nsa has been monitoring calls from german chancellor angela merkel as far back a as 2002. >> i think the most important thing is to find a basis for the future on which we can operate, and as i said today trust needs to be rebuilt which implies that trust has been severely shaken, and the members of the european union share these concerns today. true change is necessary. >> reporter: when barack obama was running for president in 2008 he went to german and pledged a new era of u
intentions, what they call leadership intentions, foreign policy objectives, human rights and then threats of the financial system. i find the last one to the financial system. what threats to the financial system does the vatican pose? >> that's a bit of a head scratcher because it doesn't have a particularly large amount of economic clout. occasionally they make comments about policy suggestion for how to help the world economy and how to help the world develop particularly in the developing world but it doesn't wield a lot of financial power. it isn't that big financially. it does have an institute. now, there's the institute for the works of religion which is kind of a bank that's set up to help coordinate charitable activities and currently the pope -- both pope francis and pope benedict had been working to kind of clean up some of the activity and put the vatican bank in a more rigorous footing. but it's a small bank in the scale of things. and so i don't really know what kind of threats they would imagine the holy sea would pose. >> it's very, very interesting i appreciate you givin
allegations threaten to disrupt foreign policy with u.s. allies. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries to where the suggestion is that we've listened in. i think we have repair work to do and hard questions to ask of the n.s.a. about what's really happening in this program. >> congressman peter king, the chairman of the house homeland security committee said america should stop apologizing. >> the reality is the n.s.a. has saved thousands of lives in the united states, france and germany and throughout europe. the french is someone to talk. they have carried out spying operations against the united states, both the government and industry. as far as germany, that's where the hamburg blot began which started 9/11. the french and germans and other european countries, we are not doing this for the fun of it. >> former vice president dick cheney agrees the u.s. should remain cautious. >> the overall capabilities are important and need to be preserved. >>
, you would probably be upset, you could understand it at some level because spying is part of foreign policy, but you are a human being and you would be ticked off and she is. >> united states is not the only country that spies on world leaders. madeline albright said that once she was at the united nations and said. >> rick: a french are ambassador asked her about something she said on a phone call. this is not unusual that people spy. >> a group of soldiers in mosl, injured more than 150, it raises this month's death toll to 545 people killed. a surge in sectarian violence has killed more than 500,000 people around iraq. >>> in line with agreement to eliminate all of the weapons by mid 2014. al jazeera's kimberly dukehart has more. >>> syria is meeting an ambitious deadline set by opcew to destroy its lethal stockpile by next year. syria handed over the detail thursday ahead of its october 27th deadline. opcw is not releasing what their report says but it did say the syrian government disclosed 23 chemical weapon sights, the head said last week that the country has so far been coo
, american foreign policy towards syria. the meeting, the deputy prime minister re-engagement with elements of the assad regime and shows americans deep involved and engagement in pushing for a political settlement inside syria. interesting developments there. i want to move on and talk about the meeting between peace envoy lakhdar brahimi, who was expected to hold talks with president assad. lakhdar brahimi says he has seen assad playing a role in a new syria, but not as a leader. do you think this is something assad is likely to agree to? >> not at all. in fact, not only assad would not agree to what mr lakhdar brahimi publicly stated, lakhdar brahimi yesterday tried to distance himself from his own announcement on syrian television, saying the statement was taken out of context. president assad warned lakhdar brahimi to stay faithful to his mission, not to make any statements outside of his mission. the reality is that there is a stalemate in the syrian crisis. the reality is the syrian opposition is divided. the assad regime is not going to make a compromise or really give the oppositio
and they are very upset. you think what implications will this have not only on foreign policy and trade but what's preventing them from saying screw you to us. >> you know what's preventing them? we're the exceptional nation. what are you going to do? >> i think president obama has serious mending to do and i don't think he deserves the blame but he has a job ahead of him to rebuild the trust. >> we're witnessing a surveillance industrial complex that is increasingly going rogue. it's broader at home and broader abroad than they told the president. >> what they are doing to us. >> i have to be on record i do believe what the president has said this week and i have to be on the r0rd there's a problem when the nsa doesn't tell the president what they are doing at this high level. >> the fans have been weighing in and saying whether they believe the president was ignorant of what the nsa was doing. 46% said the president probably did know about the program. several ways you can get involved here. the poll is up on the facebook page and also on the cycle.msnbc.com. one of the great legal minds of ou
interests as a result of this revelation is as important as the foreign policy consequences, because what european company will want to use american networking capacity and other types of computer technologies as a result of this. finally, one other thing. i'm really embarrassed for this white house. i feel awfully sorry for the president because this is basically going to undermine the -- our transatlantic alliance for many years to come, just at a time when we're negotiating an iran agreement. where our european allies are so important to us. >> meanwhile there are some republican leaders coming out, republican congressman peter king defending the u.s. spying on world leaders. take a listen to this. >> i think the president should stop apologizing, stop being defensive. the reality is the nsa has saved thousands of lives, not just in the united states but also in france and germany and throughout europe. and we're not doing this for the fun of it. this is to gather valuable intelligence which helps not just us but also helps the europeans. >> so, mark, we have allies that are upset with
million of us are being spied on as well as the rest of the world. if you want to talk about foreign-policy, i have the democrats and republicans, it is not good. we need to take a step back, look at what we're doing and then make wise choices. thanks. chris from california is next. chris on our independent line. think this nsa program has been way out of line since it began during the bush administration where the american people find out about it. president in our past history called nixon who is spying on a hotel and he was forced to resign. whether obama knew about this or not, he supposed to know this and if he did not know he should resign for lack of ability to do his job heard this is insane what we're doing. we are spying on every human being possible am a friend, foe, everything. example that we are sending to children. do think we can rebuild trust in this issue? inler: i think the trust this country has been down the tubes for the last 15 or 20 years. you can show many examples of that. thes not just the nsa, now tpp has been going on for years now. nobody in this country knows
, there are real risks of disclosure. so it's kind of the classic foreign policy dilemma that you have very modest tactical benefits and a huge strategic risk. that has now blown up in our faces. >> bill? >> i would say if you're going to eavesdrop on phone calls of the german chancellor, that has to be something that the president of the united states authorizes and thinks frankly is worth the risk of exposure, as nick says. you can't just have the bureaucracy doing that. i would like to know, did this president or the previous president, for that matter, sanction that and if so, maybe they thought it was worth it. i don't have a principled problem with listening to other people's calls, even some allies, if we think it's important. you shouldn't do it in a haphazard way which generally damages relations with the real ally. >> do you think it's true that the president of the united states would not know that the nsa is listening in to angela merkel's phone conversations? >> you know, i'm a little mystified by that. i talked today to a former senior cia official and asked about that, and this pers
comment on our foreign policy by former vice president dick cheney. listen to this. >> i think our friend no longer count on us, no longer trust us and our adversaries don't fear us. that is the cornerstone and base of u.s. ability and influence. if we're not heavily involved there, if we turned our back on the region, if we have a president who believes we overreacted to the terrorism attacks on 9/11, i think the saudis, the emiratis, egyptians, many in that part of the world no longer have confidence in the united states. martha: does this president lack confidence or even respect to some extent from some of these world leaders and is that part of the reason that we're seeing this kind of outrage about all this? >> by all accounts president obama does not have close personal relationships with foreign leaders the way reagan did with thatcher or bill clinton did with tony blair or president bush with angela merkel for that matter or with sarkozy. in the middle east he had very inconsistent policy for instance with syria. he basically told france by all accounts that we were going to atta
in just one month. how this could affect u.s. foreign policy on fighting terrorism and is other key issues, we expect to hear more on the white house news conference scheduled to begin in 90 minutes kyla campbell ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and diane feinstein plans to give continued authority. she heads the senate select committee on intelligence. they are drafting legislation to put restrictions on the nsa phone records program. the legislation would allow the nsa to continue gathering records listing the numbers, time and duration of all u.s. telephone calls but not their content the. >>> time is 8:15. well, this week marks the first anniversary of superstorm sandy. one of the nation's worst natural disaster. this morning historic ellis island will reopen for the first time since that big storm slammed into new york harbor. superstorm sandy ravaged the island, left it without power for several months. the clean up work is far from over despite the reopening today. ellis island is best known as you know for ushering millions of immigrants into the united states over the years. now, a lot oa
about whether it was on economic policy or foreign policy, so the idea that he would be disengaged is unless something happened, i have never seen in the two years of intensity when i was there, i just don't buy it. >> so a very forceful defense of president obama by his first white house chief of staff. one other thing that was interesting is mayor emanuel when he was chief of staff, brooke, he was very open about suggesting that there not be this very ambitious widespread attempt to reform health care in this country. he thought it should be a more incremental approach, expanding health care for children and small businesses, but president obama disagreed with him. he talked about that at length also in terms of president obama wanting to hear opposing points of view, brooke. >> as you point out, the president speaking in a matter of minutes from boston, then we'll watch for you, jake tapper, and watch for this interview with the now current mayor of chicago, rahm emanuel. "the lead" starts in just a couple minutes. thank you, sir, for that. >>> before i let you know, coming up,
the domain of foreign policy, whether the central government is on board because the prime minister of pakistan is going to be briefed by his cabinet in the next few hours and is going to be some sort of outcome from that particular meeting with the prime minister later tonight. >> we will continue to follow that, and thank you. elections turn violent sunday in parts of kosovo and masked men burst in throwing tear gas and smashing ballot boxes and the police were across the city and the first time they are voting in local elections since they declared independence in 2008. when the storm season calms and dangerous exit begins and 50 people are missing after a boat capsized and eight people were rescued and carrying muslims and they are a muslim minority in myanmar and persecuted and 200 people have been killed in violence and hundreds in camps and they tried to flee the country. east of the bay another boat accident killed at least six tourists, a boat capsized and it was over crowded and took on water and sank. the capacity is 150 but there have been more than 200 on board. witness
in charge, the foreign policy guy he's the chief executive of the united states government responsible for the irs and all the agencies under him. maybe you consider that conceptual but it's real an every time something gets screwed up out there there's a sense he may not be involved. that's not way it ought to be. we only get one guy in there and that's the chief executive and he ought to be accountable. >> chris matthews thank you so much. we'll see you tonight at 7:00 on "hardball." julie pace thank you as well. i hope you put up with me. chuck and michael steele stay with us if you can. up next superstorm sandy one year later. we revisit one of the hardest hit areas. plus senator chuck schumer on what's still need in the recovery efforts. in the coming addition joe will be taking part in a series of events to mark the upcoming publication of his brand new book "the right path." it's the right time for this book. it scares me, actually. things kick off on monday november 11th at columbia university the miller theater there. he'll sit down with jon meacham. you can get free admissio
formulate an effective foreign and national security policy. we're looking for that. so we're looking for information that helps us -- >>. >> ifill: that's pretty broad though. >> of course it's broad. we're looking for information that help us understand how other countries think and how they plan to operate. and that can make our relationship with them much more affective and productive. >> ifill: is that what european nations are looking for as well? >> i think that european nations it are looking for some supervision and some limits. the nsa sucks in as much information as it does partly because it can. partly because of new information technologies, the internet, wireless, cell phones. and the europeans simply have a political culture that is more sensitive to privacy than in the united states. >> ifill: so they handle their intelligence differently than we would necessarily. >> well, they haven't made much more progress on these kinds of issues among themselves than they have with us. they don't have an eu-wide approach to intelligence. they have their individual member states b
to target foreign leaders' intentions to try to determine what the best policy might be for the united states of america? thing ithe first learned in intelligence school in 1963. leadership intentions, no matter what led -- level you are talking about. believe the allies have conducted any kind of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> are you familiar with a story from the former french head of the dcri? >> that is the french domestic intelligence organization. >> let me read you a quote. i am amazed by such disconcerting naÏvetÉ. you'd almost inc. our politicians don't bother to read the ports they get from their ourlligence -- think politicians don't bother to read the reports they get from their intelligence department. say, some of this reminds me of the classic movie casablanca. my god, there is gambling going on here. it is the same kind of thing. alexander, in your experience as director of the security agency, have allies in the united states engaged in anything that you call and espionage act toward the unit
foreign leaders' intentions to dry to determine the best policy for the united states of america? >> it's one of the first things i learned in intelligence school in 1983 that this is the fundmental given in the intelligence business is leadership intentions, no matter what level you're talking about. that can be military leaders as well. >> do you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence service, our leaders, or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> are you familiar with a story recently from the former french head of the direct -- well, the dcri -- are you familiar with that? >> that's the french domestic intelligence organization. >> let me read you a quote from that gentleman. quote, i'm amazed by such disconcerning naivety, he said in the interview. you'd think the politicians don't read reports they get from the intelligence services. he's talking about french spying on our allies including the united states of america. do you find that consistent with what you know as director of the nationa
intelligence or suspected foreign agents. >> one major point was made to surveillance policies, saying everybody else is doing it too. they claim some of the information came from nato allies, not u.s. spying. greece has admitted to spying on the u.s. and others in the 1990's at the hearing. james clapper made it clear the u.s. is in good company. >> you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence service leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> he said the white house was aware the n.s.a. oversees eavesdropping all along, but may not have known specifics. >> russian leaders denying reports of spying on overseas leaders. they are accused of passing out bugged gift bags at last months g-20 summit. the report by two italian newspapers say delegates were given memory sticks and phone chargers equipped with spyware. it's unclear how many leaders received the bags or used the free bees. >> edward snowden can earn a ticket out of russia if he testifies about spying. germany are investigating report
't just leaders themselves. it's what goes on around them and the policies that they convey to their governments. >> certainly in my time since being in the business of fbi agent since 2004 in this committee i have always found the best way to determine a foreign leader's intentions is to somehow it either get close to a foreign leader or -- of a foreign leader. would that be accurate? >> yes it would. >> how many years you have been in the intelligence, for many years as the something new that the intelligence committee might try to target -- >> it's one of the first things i learned in intel. it's the fundamental given in the intelligence business. leadership intentionintention s not matter what level you are talking about and that could be military leaders as well. >> you believe that the allies have it at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america our intelligence services or leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> are you familiar with the story recently from the former french head of the dcr i? are you familiar with that? >> that's the
that there is an effort from the party to minimize it. the party of policy -- party policy today is to build an inclusive society. in this context, it is not in the party's some advantage to play on ethnic tension at all. >> the daily foreign ministry briefing in beijing, questions about a uighur connection drew this response. >> you are very interested in the situation. i can reliably inform you that the current situation is by and large good and the economic and social development is very good. like i said here earlier, people from all ethnic groups want solidarity, stability and growth. the leapfrog development achieved here in terms of the economy, society and culture has been the result of a joint effort by people from all ethnic groups in xinjiang. >> steve tsang, are you convinced? >> not at all. what the government spokesman said, there is no semblance to the reality there. the idea that they treat it as a terrorist incident is also not well-based. if the chinese government really saw what happened in tiananmen square as a terrorist attack, they would have taken it very seriously. they would have
name it. like many institutions of higher education, a high number of the students there are foreign national whors studying under student visas. under our current immigration policy, mr. speaker, our state, our public state institutions, we provide this world class education for people that feel a need in the economy. they're going to be great engineers, great mathematicians, great computer scientists. they graduate with a masters, a ph.d., what do we tell them? go back to another country and compete against us. compete against us. we're telling them to compete against us. how does that make sense, mr. speaker? what we need to do is provide a way, and the senate bill and h.r. 15 do this, where people with advanced degrees in these fields are able to stay here. today's companies don't care where the jobs are. you can be a computer programmer in india. you can be a computer programmer in france. you can be a computer programmer here. out of convenience we'd rather have you here but the job is going to follow you. the job is going to follow you, not the other way around. in addition, i
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)